• By Laura Otto

    Halloween will look a little different this year as the country continues to navigate the challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    As communities search for ways to keep children safe and practice social distancing on Oct. 31, many homeowners associations are turning to trunk-or-treating as an alternative to traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating. Trunk-or-treating is becoming a widely popular alternative to walking from house to house. The practice is most commonly found in Southern U.S. states, where neighbors use a church or community parking lot and decorate car trunks to welcome trick-or-treaters.

    Sienna Associations in Missouri City, Texas, is getting creative this year to keep their spooky traditions alive. “We’ve moved our annual Halloween camp out to a camp at home event as we couldn’t guarantee social distancing,” says Cyndi Hernandez, community relations manager at Sienna Associations. This very popular event is usually held outdoors at the association’s sports complex, explains Hernandez. “Our team is working to make it just as special for families at home,” she adds.

    New this year, the association is hosting a drive-thru boo. The event is a contactless trick-or- treating experience, including a Halloween car decorating contest. “All you have to do is drive through our winding road, roll down your window at each stop, stick out your bag and treats will magically appear,” says Hernandez. People are asked to wear masks and remain in their car to make the event as safe as possible.

    For more information on how to safely celebrate Halloween this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put together a list of low-risk activities.

     

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